Coping During the Pandemic

Coping During the Pandemic Playlists

View video playlists related to specific topics, including both participants and grief professionals. Use the controls at the top-left to navigate videos within each playlist or use the larger arrows to view additional playlists.

Grief Stories features short videos, podcast interviews, and blog posts offering ideas for coping with grief. The tools and activities on this website are intended to be used as a resource for people who are grieving, those who are supporting grievers and healthcare professionals. The information provided is NOT meant to be a substitute for professional therapy.

All content, including our videos, is vetted by health care experts.

Grief Involves Powerful Emotions.

Experiencing loss during the pandemic includes all the usual challenges of grief. It also involves navigating on-going changes and uncertainty that impact how we honour and remember someone who has died.

From isolation during illness to restrictions on gatherings for funerals and memorials, all aspects of loss are affected. At the same time, we're coping with anxiety and struggles in our day-to-day lives brought on by the realities of the pandemic. At Grief Stories, we're grateful for the support of Northumberland United Way in creating supportive content for those experiencing loss during the pandemic.

Content Funded By

Northumberland United Way logo

Northumberland United Way

We are thankful for the Northumberland United Way Grant Funding that was distributed to respond to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in our community.

Pandemic-Related Blog

Grieving Through Another Pandemic Holiday Season

Posted in

Post by Maureen Pollard, MSW, RSW Grieving Through Another Pandemic Holiday Season This is our second year collectively facing a crisis across…

Anticipatory Grief During a Pandemic

Posted in

Post by Maureen Pollard, MSW, RSW It is 2020 and the world is gripped by a relentless pandemic. The news is filled…

Practical Possibilities for Mourning in a Pandemic

Posted in

Post by Maureen Pollard, MSW, RSW Practical Possibilities for Mourning in a Pandemic When someone we care about dies, we have a…

Thinking About Death and Dying

Posted in

Post by Maureen Pollard, MSW, RSW Though everyone eventually dies, it can be difficult to think about death and dying and many…

All Pandemic-Related Videos

Learning from Grief

By Noelle Bailey

Grief is weird. Odd start, I know, but that was the sentence I used a lot whenever someone asked me how I was. It was never a constant feeling; it changed day to day. And still does. It’s the full gambit of emotions from sadness to anger to guilt and, though dark, even humour found its way in.

In December of 2019, I lost my father. His health had been declining for several months, and we had started the process to diagnose and begin treatment for what we knew was probably cancer. At his first appointment with his oncologist, he was immediately admitted to the ER. By the next day he was on a ventilator, and within twelve days they came to tell me that the cancer had spread everywhere. We had lost a fight we hadn’t even really begun. In March of 2022, my mother passed away after a 14 year fight with MS. It was a much different process to lose her by degrees over those 14 years, witnessing her own body turn against her while powerless to do anything to stop it.

Those are my two experiences with the strangeness of grief. They were vastly different experiences, but also similar in that they cut me in two and changed my life.

The two biggest things I’ve taken from my grieving process are these:

1. I will, for the rest of my life, miss the conversations we will never have. There are books I’ve read since they left that I would love to talk to my mom about. My dad never got to hear about my new job, and he would have loved it. Pictures people have brought me that I can never ask them about, stories I missed out on hearing. The moments of my life, big and small, that they won’t be here for is the part that takes me under every time.

2. I can grieve however I need to. It doesn’t need to look a certain way or be anything other than what I need. I struggled a lot after losing my mom with the idea that I wasn’t sad enough or broken enough because after watching her long hard battle there was a certain peace lacing itself through the pain. When we laid my parents to rest in the cemetery next to my grandparents, we played “The Rainbow Connection” sung by Kermit the Frog because that’s what my mom had always said she wanted to play to say goodbye. Then my husband, Cale, and I did a shot of Jack, like my dad and Cale did when they went out for my dad’s 60th.

I’ve never been very good at setting boundaries in my life, but I tried very hard to make sure I set them surrounding my grief. To let myself do whatever I needed to process the loss of my parents and not to let anyone tell me I should be acting or feeling a certain way. I laughed at things they would have laughed at, and when I needed to, I cried. I am slowly learning how to live in a world without my parents, and know that I will be for the rest of my life.

Jean – Be good to yourself

Jean – Be good to yourself

Jean shares about support and not being hard on yourself

Jean – Grief resources and self care

Jean – Grief resources and self care

Jean talks about resources that help in processing grief and self care

Jean – Helping your children through grief

Jean – Helping your children through grief

Jean discusses how helping her children through grief also helped her

Jean – My own grief and being a professional counsellor

Jean – My own grief and being a professional counsellor

Jean shares about being a counselor and going through her own grief

Jean – My Story

Jean – My Story

Jean talks about isolation and grieving during a pandemic

Jean – Traditions and grief

Jean – Traditions and grief

Jean discusses belief systems and traditions

Jean – Coping

Jean – Coping

Jean shares how coping can be complicated

Jean – It’s all about love

Jean – It’s all about love

Jean talks about losing her husband to a heart attack on valentines day

Jean – What grief feels like physically

Jean – What grief feels like physically

Jean discusses the physical effects she has experienced in grief